Taylor Warranty Service

Lowden Authorized Repair/Setup

Fender Authorized Service Center

Gretsch Authorized Service Center

Guild Authorized Service Center

Tacoma Authorized Service Center

EVH Authorized Service Center

Charvel Authorized Service Center

Jackson Authorized Service Center

John Suhr Pickups and Electronics Authorized Sales, Installation, and Service

D'Addario strings and Planet Waves accessories

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Thank you for your interest in Golfen Guitar Repair.  GGR is a full-service musical instrument repair shop specializing in the repair, restoration, customization and maintenance of all fretted instruments.  We're located in Upper Darby, PA, about a 20-minute drive from downtown Philadelphia.

Whether you're considering a full restoration of a vintage instrument or you just need the strings changed on your first guitar, we'll take the time to understand exactly what you need and to discuss all options with you.  Our goal is to keep your instrument in top condition and to make sure that it's adjusted to complement your individual playing style.

Contact us by phone at 610-348-5854 or email (info<at>golfenguitar.com) for an appointment.  Appointments are available on weekdays, evenings, and weekends.

Coming Soon Accidents can happen at home! Keeping your guitar out of harmís way, Part 1 Tired of hearing your single coil pickups humming along on every tune?  Read about the Suhr Backplate Silent Single Coil (BPSSC) System Golfen Guitar Repair, a complete fretted instrument repair facility located just outside of Philadelphia, PA, provides repair, customization, restoration, and maintenance services for all types of fretted instruments including classical guitars, steel-string acoustic guitars, electric guitars, electric basses, banjos, and mandolins.  We offer warranty service for Lowden, Taylor, Fender, Guild, Gretsch, Tacoma, Suhr electronics, Warwick basses, and others. A partial list of the types of repair services that we provide includes structural repairs such as fixing cracks, re-gluing loose braces, re-attaching a lifting or detached bridge, neck resets, and repairing a broken headstock; fret work including leveling and crowning, and complete and partial re-frets; nut and saddle replacements; adjusting action and intonation; electronics repairs on guitars and basses, and lots more.  We also offer electronics customization including, but certainly not limited to, series/parallel switching and double/single coil switching for coil tapped humbucking pickups; single-coil pickup polarity reversal when necessary for hum control; full copper foil shielding; and installation of the Suhr BPSSC system for complete hum elimination with no negative impact on an instrument's sound. Give us a call at 610-348-5854 or send an email to set up an appointment to bring your instrument in for an evaluation and estimate.  I'll take the time to fully understand the problems that you're experiencing, to discuss any improvements that you'd like to have done, to carefully inspect your instrument, and to explain exactly what can be done to fix the problems and to get your guitar playing and sounding exactly as you'd like. We also have a selection of items for sale including straps, cables, humidifiers, polishes, t-shirts, and strings from D'Addario, Elixir, Savarez, Galli, and Oasis.  In addition, we often have used guitars available for sale. I first started repairing guitars professionally in the early 1970s at MacLaren Music in Havertown, PA, where I was the repairman for three years.  I then went on to pursue other things but continued to do repairs for friends and family, and on my own guitars.  Finally, in 2008, I decided that I wanted to open my own repair shop and return full-time to providing a valuable service by doing the thing that I really enjoy doing.  It's been very rewarding to see how quickly my client list has been growing since then. Playing guitar is another passion, and it's something that I've been doing since I was eleven.  My first experience with the guitar was studying steel-string folk and country blues with Jerry Ricks in Philadelphia.  I later added electric guitar and played in bands around Philadelphia, the most recent being the swing blues band Jump Time. In the late 1970s, I received a Bachelor's of Music in classical guitar performance from Temple University, studying with Peter Segal. With my many years of experience playing various types of guitars, I feel very confident in saying that I know how all types of guitars should sound and how they should feel.  I believe that every instrument that I work on benefits from that knowledge and experience. We're located in Upper Darby, PA, about a 20-minute drive from downtown Philadelphia, at: 1501 S. Keystone Ave. Upper Darby, PA  19082 610-348-5854 Send email Please call or email for an appointment.  Appointments can be arranged for weekdays, evenings or weekends. Accidents can happen at home! Keeping your guitar out of harmís way, Part 1 Guitars are pretty tough.  A steel-string acoustic guitar has to be able to withstand about 150 to 200 pounds of constant string tension.  Even a nylon-string guitar, with its thinner top and lighter bracing, has to be able to handle about 75 to 90 pounds of string tension.  An electric guitar being played by someone who likes to use extreme whammy bar techniques has to have a neck that is able to handle all of those sudden releases and increases of string tension. And yet, in a lot of ways, guitars are quite fragile.  Of course, there are always the dings and scratches that you try hard to avoid but which just seem to be inevitable.  But there are also those things that can result in catastrophic damage and which are entirely avoidable.  Those are the things that Iím hoping to help you to avoid with these tips: - Never leave your guitar leaning against a wall.  The usual way that guitars get leaned is with the back edge of the bottom on the floor and the head against the wall, but any kind of leaning is an invitation to disaster.  A rambunctious dog, a child, or even you could easily bump into it accidentally while rushing by, causing your ill-fated instrument to go flying off in any number of trajectories, none of which are fun to watch. Your guitar might actually survive its flight with no, or only minimal, damage, but there are certain structural properties that make a guitar much more prone to sustaining major damage if this happens.  A very thin neck, from front to back, in the area of the transition from the neck to the head is a point of vulnerability for cracking or even completely breaking apart.  If thereís a channel cut in the face of the head, just above the nut, to allow for adjusting the truss rod, itís somewhat more vulnerable since some of the wood has been removed.  A Gibson Les Paul is one example of a guitar with this vulnerability. Another characteristic that can affect how prone a guitar is to ending up with a broken neck if it falls is the weight of the body.  A heavy body can create enough momentum to cause the guitar to attempt a somersault, and the body ends up higher than the head.  If the area around the neck to head transition is not strong enough to withstand the weight of the body pressing down on it, it will crack.  An electric guitar with a solid mahogany body (again, like a Les Paul) is an example of a heavy bodied guitar. - Never lay a guitar on a sofa or balance it on a chairís seat and then walk away.  Itís way too easy for someone whoís not paying attention to, oh, you know.  I canít even bring myself to say it.  And if the guitar is balanced on a chairís seat, someone might bump into the neck while walking by and send it careening off, probably toward the only radiator in the room.  These things happen more often to a violin, clarinet, trumpet, or flute but it can happen to a guitar, too. - Keep your guitar stored in its case or, if the humidity in your house is well-controlled, on a sturdy stand or a wall hanger away from any high traffic areas.  If you keep it in its case, stand the case on its side rather than leaving it on its back unless you are absolutely certain that no one and no thing could possibly fall on it. If your guitar is out on a stand or a hanger and proves to be irresistible to curious but unsupervised little hands, a dogís tongue or a catís claws, then keep it in its case.  Fortunately, Iíve never actually heard of a cat deciding to use a guitar as a scratching post, but itís a nightmarish thought, isnít it? A couple of topics that I plan to cover in future installments are: - Avoiding problems when you take your guitar out of the house - Protective measures you should take to keep your guitar healthy when winter comes and the humidity level becomes dangerously low in most homes in colder climates. Suhr Backplate Silent Single Coil (BPSSC) System Everyone loves the sound of the pure single-coil pickup, but the 60-cycle hum that it generates has been an annoyance that musicians have had to deal with for over 50 years or not deal with at all and use humbucker pickups or settle for tonal compromises like stacked single-coils, dummy coils, and active electronics.  Those days are now over with the Suhr/Ilitch Electronics SSC System.  Originally only available as a built-in system on Suhr Classic guitars, the SSC is now available in a backplate that covers the tremolo spring cavity and that means you can now enjoy the benefits of this breakthrough technology on non-Suhr guitars with "pure" single-coil pickups. The BPSSC System eliminates the noise while completely retaining the sonic character of pure single-coil pickups.  The noise is gone but the sparkle, the chime, and the low-end response that you've come to love in single-coil pickups are all still there for you to enjoy and savor. Finally, after over 50 years, you can get true single-coil sound without the noise.  Many single-coil lovers had resigned to the fact that noise was a "necessary" artifact that couldn't be eliminated without compromising the tone.  The BPSSC System proves that it is possible to get great single-coil sounds without the annoying hum - once and for all! For more information about having the BPSSC System installed in your guitar, or to make an appointment to stop in and try a guitar with the BPSSC System installed, contact us by phone at 610-348-5854 or by email.


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Tired of hearing your single coil pickups humming along on every tune?  Read about the Suhr Backplate Silent Single Coil (BPSSC) System